Visitors Updates

4 days 21 hours ago

Physical objects as security threats are in the news at the moment. The oft-touched upon tale of rogue USB sticks is a common one. Being wary of random devices found on the floor, or handed out at events is a smart move. and now they're showing up in the mail. You simply don’t know what’s lurking, and it’s hard to find out safely without the right tools available. Even then, something can slip by and cause no end of trouble on your desktop or network. Read more at https://blog.malwarebytes.com/cybercrime/2022/01/attackers-are-mailing-usb-sticks-to-drop-ransomware-on-victims-computers/

2 months 1 week ago

The holiday season is nearing. Soon millions of people will be looking to buy the perfect gifts, and many of us will shop online. Unfortunately, cyber criminals will be active as well, creating fake shopping websites and other online shopping scams to steal your information or money. Learn how you can find good deals without becoming a victim at https://www.sans.org/newsletters/ouch/shopping-online-securely-nov-21/

6 months 6 days ago

I wrote about ransomware about a year ago. The only things that have changed since then are that the result of becoming infected have gotten far more severe and the number of victims has increased exponentially. Today's variants not only encrypt your data and demand payment to decrypt it, they also steal your data and threaten to expose it to the world if payment is not made. Under that scheme, even if you have proper and sufficient backups to restore your data, making the encryption moot, there is the threat that your data will be published for all to see.

We are not immune from these attacks here in the midwest. Last fall, the University of Nebraska Medical Center and Nebraska Medicine were breached. Associated costs are many tens of millions of dollars. More recently, and even closer to home, DMACC suffered a ransomware attack early last month that shut their network and classes down for almost two weeks.

Phishing provided the initial foothold for the bad actors behind these and many other similar incidents. Vigilance and skepticism when reading email remains key. Don't fall for the emotions that all phishing actors try to evoke -

  • Fear - something bad will happen if you don't click on the link in the message
  • Greed - something good will happen if you do click on the link in the message
  • Urgency - hurry up and click on the link in the message right now
  • Concern/Empathy -
    • I’m stranded in an unfamiliar city
    • I’m falsely accused, in jail, and need bail money
    • I’ve been mugged and am in the hospital

Don't click on links in email messages unless you're certain they are legitimate. Don't open attachments in email messages unless you're certain of the sender's identity and the content of the message makes sense to you. If you have any questions about the message, err on the side of safety and seek help by contacting security@uni.edu.

7 months 4 days ago

On June 18th Information Technology will replace the security certificate used to secure connections to Eduroam WiFi on campus. All UNI-owned and managed devices will be automatically reconfigured for the new connection and nothing will be required. However, personally owned laptops, tablets, and smart phones will potentially be asked to accept a new security certificate the first time they connect to Eduroam WiFi on June 17th. These prompts could look something like the screen captures below.

If you have questions or trouble connecting to Eduroaom WiFi on campus, please visit this IT support article. You can also contact your IT support by submitting a "Get IT Help" request from the Service Hub Portal.

Windows 10

windows 10 incommon certificate notice

iOS

ios incommon certificate notice

MacOS

macos incommon certificate notice

7 months 1 week ago

Mobile devices, such as tablets, smartphones, and smartwatches, have become one of the primary technologies we use in both our personal and professional lives. What makes these devices so powerful are the thousands of apps we can choose from. These apps enable us to be more productive, communicate and share with others, train and educate, or just have more fun. Here are steps you can take to securely use and make the most of today’s mobile apps. Read them at https://www.sans.org/newsletters/ouch/securely-using-mobile-apps/

11 months 1 week ago

Have I Been Hacked? No matter how secure you are, sooner or later you may have an accident and become "hacked". Below are clues you might have been hacked and if so, what to do.  See https://www.sans.org/security-awareness-training/resources/what-do-when-hacked for more information.

1 year 1 month ago

Trying to securely make the most of today’s technology can be overwhelming for almost all of us, but it can be especially challenging for family members not as used to or as familiar with technology. Therefore, we wanted to share some key steps to help secure family members who may be struggling with technology and might misunderstand the risks that come with using it. Read more at https://www.sans.org/security-awareness-training/resources/securing-generation-gap

1 year 1 month ago

While online holiday shopping is nothing new, more of us will be avoiding the malls and brick-and-mortar stores this year — which opens up big opportunities for cybercriminals. This, along with COVID-19, is expected to anchor most of the scam and phishing lures in circulation this season.  Read more at https://threatpost.com/online-holiday-shopping-phishing/161412/

1 year 2 months ago

A common misconception about cyber attackers is that they use only highly advanced tools and techniques to hack into peoples’ computers or accounts. Cyber attackers have learned that the easiest ways to steal your information, hack your accounts, or infect your systems is by simply tricking you into doing it for them using a technique called social engineering. Read more on this month's OUCH! newsletter from SANS, https://www.sans.org/security-awareness-training/resources/social-engineering-attacks

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